Nayoung Aimee Kwon

Associate Professor in the Department of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies

External address: 
2204 Erwin Road Room 209, Box 90414, Durham, NC 27708
Internal office address: 
Box 90414, Durham, NC 27708-0414
Phone: 
(919) 684-4086

My academic training began in literary criticism and intellectual history in East Asia (Korea and Japan) and the United States. My current research examines the contested politics of cultural memories, with particular focus on historical conflicts in East Asia and the Asia-Pacific. I have been exploring literary, historical, and film archives in East Asia (Korea, Japan, and China) from the colonial, wartime, and cold war eras that are available for the first time after decades in obscurity as well as their local and global legacies. To understand these texts and the entangled histories of their production and circulation, I draw analytical methodologies from various disciplines including global cultural studies, literary, film and media studies, postcolonial theory, intellectual history, and gender studies. Select publications include Intimate Empire, published by Duke University Press (Korean translation by Somyŏng Press) which examines the forgotten lure of the imperial language in the contested colonial history between Korea and Japan. A co-edited volume (with Takashi Fujitani), Antinomies of the Colonial Archive, explores colonial-era cinematic coproductions and contested postcolonial legacies in East Asia. With collaborators at Duke University (Leo Ching and Shai Ginsburg) and TNO/University of Netherlands (Anja Vanderhulst and Rudy Boonekamp), I am developing a hybrid platform infinite strategy game (ISG) about historical conflicts. I am a translator of literature and manhwa/manga from Korean and Japanese into English, and co-director (with Hae-Young Kim and Hwansoo Kim) of Duke Engage South Korea.  I have taught at UCLA, Arizona State University, and Duke Kunshan University.

Areas of interest: literary criticism and translation, film and media studies, intellectual history, postcolonial theory, gender and sexuality.

Primary regions: Korea, Japan

Secondary regions: China, United States Affiliations: Asian & Middle Eastern Studies,  Arts of the Moving Image, Gender, Sexuality & Feminist Studies

Overview

Nayoung Aimee Kwon is Associate Professor in the Department of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies, the Program in Gender, Sexuality, and Feminist Studies and the Program in the Arts of the Moving Image. Her research areas include literary criticism and translation studies; film and media studies; intellectual history; postcolonial theory; gender and sexuality, with particular focus on inter-Asian and transpacific (Asian/American) cultural encounters. Her current research examines the contested politics of cultural memories, with particular focus on historical conflicts and their legacies in East Asia and the Asia-Pacific.  Select publications include Intimate Empire, published by Duke University Press (Korean translation from Somyŏng Press) which examines the forgotten lure of the imperial language in the contested colonial history between Korea and Japan, Antinomies of the Colonial Archive (co-edited with Takashi Fujitani) which explores colonial-era cinematic co-productions and contested postcolonial legacies in East Asia, and various articles in journals such as Journal of Asian Studies, Postcolonial Studies, Social Text, Cross-Currents. With collaborators at Duke University and TNO/University of Netherlands, she is developing a hybrid platform infinite strategy game (ISG) about historical conflicts. She is a translator of literature and manhwa/manga from Korean and Japanese into English, and co-director of Duke Engage South Korea, a program working with refugees and migrants.  Her research and teaching interests also include inter-Asian and transpacific transcultural co-productions (literature, film, theater); literary and filmic exchanges; theories of empire, translation, and postcoloniality; globalization and transpacific migrations and cultural flows between Asia and America.  She has taught at UCLA, Arizona State University, and Duke Kunshan University.

Kwon, NA. "Images of Korea in Japanese Literature." Imperatives of Culture: Selected Essays on Korean History, Culture, and Society from the Japanese Colonial Era. University of Hawaii Press, 2013.

Kwon, NA, and translator, . "Foreign Husband." Into the Light: Anthology of Resident Korean Literature. Ed. M Wender. University of Hawaii Press, 2010.

Kwon, NA. "Conflicting Nostalgia: Performing The Tale of Ch'unhyang (春香傳) in the Japanese Empire." The Journal of Asian Studies 73.01 (February 2014): 113-141. Full Text

Kwon, N, and Kwon, NA. "What/Where is Decolonial Asia?." Social Text (July 2013). (Academic Article)

Kwon, NA. "“Collaboration, Coproduction, Code-Switching.”." Cross Currents: East Asian History and Culture Review (December 2012). (Academic Article)

Kwon, NA. "PRIMITIVE SELVES: Koreana in the Japanese Colonial Gaze, 1910-1945, vol 5." PACIFIC AFFAIRS 85.1 (March 2012): 211-214. (Review)

Kwon, NA. "From Wonso Pond." JOURNAL OF ASIAN STUDIES 70.4 (November 2011): 1174-1175. (Review) Full Text

Kwon, NA. "Colonial Modernity and the Conundrum of Representation: Korean Literature 
in the Japanese Empire." Postcolonial Studies 13.4 (2010): 421-439. (Academic Article)

Kwon, NA. "Ambivalence of the ‘Colonized I-Novel’: Kim Saryang and the Japanese Literary Establishment." Journal of Korean Literature (Hanguk munhak yôngu) (December 2009). (Academic Article)