CAH Workshops & Programs

Due to COVID-19, our Sixth Annual Critical Asian Humanities Workshop, scheduled for April 10-11, 2020, was cancelled.

We will share information regarding our next Critical Asian Humanities Workshop, when available.

Past Workshops

Duke University
April 5-6, 2019

Duke University will host its fifth annual Critical Asian Humanities workshop on April 5-6, 2019. Integrating approaches and methodologies from cultural studies, critical theory, and area studies, we identify Critical Asian Humanities as an interdisciplinary field that emphasizes humanistic inquiry while critically interrogating many of the assumptions on which the humanities have traditionally relied.

Duke University
April 6-7, 2018

Duke University will host a select graduate school conference in conjunction with its fourth annual Critical Asian Humanities workshop, which will be held on April 6-7, 2018. Integrating approaches and methodologies from cultural studies, critical theory, and area studies, we identify Critical Asian Humanities as an interdisciplinary field that emphasizes humanistic inquiry while critically interrogating many of the assumptions on which humanities have traditionally relied.

The 2018 Workshop's keynote speakers will be:

  • Thomas Lamarre (McGill), "Media Studies, Area Studies"
  • Tina Lu (Yale), "Toward a Psychology of the Seventeenth Century"
  • Jennifer Ho (UNC), "Transnational and Transpacific Intimacies:A Family/Familiar Story"

Speakers/Presenters:

  • Daniel Cohen (Stanford), "Genre Unbound: Some Reflections on the Use of Genre in Cao Fei's Haze and Fog"
  • Kate Costello (Oxford), "Machine Translation and the Poetics of Artificial Language: Hsia Yu's Pink Noise and Experimental Translation at the Intersections of the Digital"
  • Emily Cowan (University of Kansas), "George Masa's Photography"
  • Tenggeer Hao (Columbia), "Between the World Viewed and A World Heard-Film-Philosophy in Chen Kaige's Cinema"
  • Lisa Hofmann-Kuroda (UCBerkley), "Transpacific Victorian Science and the Composite Photograph: The Case of Lafcadio Hearn/Koizumi Yakumo
  • Junting Huang (Cornell), "Chinoise, Chi-noise?: Urban Mediascape, Acoustic Territory and Yao Dajuin's Sonic Avant-Garde"

Duke University
March 31 - April 1, 2017

Duke University will host a select graduate student conference in conjunction with its third annual Critical Asian Humanities workshop, which will run from March 31 to April 1, 2017. Integrating approaches and methodologies from cultural studies, critical theory, and area studies, we identify Critical Asian Humanities as an interdisciplinary field that emphasizes humanistic inquiry while critically interrogating many of the assumptions on which the humanities have traditionally relied.

Duke University
April 8-9, 2016

Duke University will host a select graduate student conference on April 8th, 2016, in conjunction with its second annual Critical Asian Humanities workshop, which will run from April 8th to April 9th. Integrating approaches and methodologies from cultural studies, critical theory, and area studies, Critical Asian Humanities is an interdisciplinary field that emphasizes humanistic inquiry while critically interrogating many of the assumptions on which the humanities have traditionally relied.
 
The graduate student conference component of the workshop will feature papers by 4-6 graduate students, to be selected by a panel of Duke faculty and grad. students. Duke will cover the domestic travel and 3 days of room/board for the graduate students who are invited to speak.
 
Although the workshop does not have a formal theme, preference will be given to graduate student papers that complement the keynote speakers’ focus on transregionalism and transnationalism. Students working on Asia in any discipline in the humanities or interpretive social sciences are welcome to apply.

Duke University
April 3-4, 2015

Integrating approaches and methodologies from cultural studies, critical theory, and area studies, Critical Asian Humanities is an interdisciplinary field that emphasizes humanistic inquiry while critically interrogating many of the assumptions on which the humanities have traditionally relied.

Speaker/Presenters Bios

Wai-yee Li
Professor of Chinese Literature; Director of Graduate Studies
Harvard University

Wai-yee Li has been Professor of Chinese Literature at Harvard since 2000. Li earned her B.A. from the University of Hong Kong and her Ph.D. from Princeton University (1987), where she was associate professor from 1996 to 2000. She also taught at the University of Pennsylvania and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Li’s research spans topics ranging from early Chinese thought and narrative to late imperial Chinese literature and culture. Her recent publications include The Readability of the Past in Early Chinese Historiography (Harvard, 2007), which investigates the ordering impulse of Chinese culture in understanding the past, as evinced by how different conceptions of rhetoric and exegesis determine interpretation; and Women and National Trauma in Late Imperial Chinese Literature (Harvard, 2014), which explores how history and literature intersect, how the multivalent presence of women in different genres mediates the experience and expression of political disorder during the seventeenth century Ming-Qing dynastic transition and beyond. Li’s co-edited volume of translations of ten seminal plays from the 13th and 14th centuries, The Columbia Anthology of Yuan Drama, was also published in 2014. Her annotated translation of Zuozhuan, in collaboration with Stephen Durrant and David Schaberg, will be published in 2015. Her co-authored book, Sima Qian and the Letter to Ren An, is being reviewed for publication. She is co-editing The Oxford Handbook of Classical Chinese Literature with Wiebke Denecke and Tian Xiaofei. Li has received fellowships or grants from the Harvard Society of Fellows, the Chiang Ching-kuo Foundation, ACLS, Radcliffe Institute of Advanced Study, and the American Academy in Berlin. She has taught courses on Ming-Qing culture, early Chinese thought and historiography, gender and sexuality, and premodern fiction and drama. In July of 2014, Li was elected by Academia Sinica to its List of Academicians.

Lisa Lowe
Distinguished Professor; Director, Center for the Humanities
Tufts University

Professor Lowe's bio is available on the Tufts University website.

Lisa Yoneyama
Professor, Department of East Asian Studies & Women and Gender Studies Institute
University of Toronto

Lisa Yoneyama received Ph.D. in Cultural Anthropology at Stanford University, California. Prior to joining the University of Toronto, she taught Cultural Studies and U.S.-Japan Studies at University of California, San Diego, where she also served as Director of the Program for Japanese Studies and Critical Gender Studies Program.

Her research interests have always centered on the memory politics concerning war and colonialism, issues related to gender and militarism, and the cultural dimensions of transnationalism, neo-colonialism, and nuclearism, as well as the Cold War and post-Cold War U.S. relations with Asia. Yoneyama was born in the United States and received her primary and secondary education in Kyoto, Japan.

Rey Chow
Anne Firor Scott Professor of Literature in Trinity College of Arts and Sciences
Duke University

Chow's research comprises theoretical, interdisciplinary, and textual analyses. Since her years as a graduate student at Stanford University, she has specialized in the making of cultural forms such as literature and film (with particular attention to East Asia, Western Europe, and North America), and in the discursive encounters among modernity, sexuality, postcoloniality, and ethnicity. Her book PRIMITIVE PASSIONS was awarded the James Russell Lowell Prize by the Modern Language Association. Before coming to Duke, she was Andrew W. Mellon Professor of the Humanities at Brown University, where she held appointments in the Departments of Comparative Literature, English, and Modern Culture and Media. In her current work, Chow is concerned with the legacies of poststructuralist theory (in particular the work of Michel Foucault), the politics of language as a postcolonial phenomenon, and the shifting paradigms for knowledge and lived experience in the age of visual technologies and digitial media.